BREAKING WEATHER:  AIRPORT DELAYS
Severe Weather and Storms to Continue Through Thursday
 
The Central Plains will once again come into focus on Wednesday as the threat of severe weather will form in the Texas Panhandle and push north as far as the southern portion of North Dakota.
 
Drenching rain will be a problem across much of the Eastern portion of the U.S. where thunderstorms are likely in the South and throughout the Mid-Atlantic where damage is possible from strong winds and flash flooding.
 
A rare cause for concern is also developing in the Tropics where a band of weather is pushing north into Florida and the South to bring a risk of a tropical storm arriving early in the season.

Accuweather reports the first tropical storm or depression of the 2018 season could be seen as early as Tuesday night with warm air and precipitation pushing into the Florida Panhandle.
 
Some models are reporting the storm will lack the power to produce a large amount of damage as the temperature of water in the Atlantic Ocean is offering marginal chances of a tropical storm developing.
 
The storm could still take a turn to the west and gain power as it passes over the Gulf of Mexico to produce storms as far west as the border region between Alabama and Florida; as the week progresses the storm is expected to pass over the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic bringing the threat of flash floods and dangerous surf to many areas.

Wednesday afternoon and early evening will be marked by the rising chances of severe weather moving through the Central Plains as the Texas Panhandle once again comes into the firing line for thunderstorms and possible tornadoes.
 
A line of storms is being forecast by The Weather Channel which will push into northern Texas and Oklahoma in the Deep South. Severe thunderstorms and possible tornadoes could also be seen along the border between Colorado and Kansas before striking Nebraska and the Dakotas.
 
Above-average temperatures will be seen in many of the areas affected by severe weather including Lubbock, Texas where the daytime high will reach 89F.

Another major band of rain has begun to develop in the Southwest where daytime highs will hit the low to mid-70s across the Pacific Northwest and the Northern Rockies where thunderstorms could develop across Montana.
 
By Thursday, this band of rain will have moved into the Northern Plains and Midwest but should not offer a significant chance of severe weather developing across any part of the U.S.
 
The Northeast should remain clear of rain and storms as Boston hits a daytime high of 77F.
 
As the tropical band of weather moves into the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic, storms could be seen from Tampa, Florida where a daytime high of 85 will be possible and Atlanta, Georgia which will reach a Thursday high of 79.
 
The Central Plains will once again come into focus on Wednesday as the threat of severe weather will form in the Texas Panhandle and push north as far as the southern portion of North Dakota.

 
Drenching rain will be a problem across much of the Eastern portion of the U.S. where thunderstorms are likely in the South and throughout the Mid-Atlantic where damage is possible from strong winds and flash flooding.
 
A rare cause for concern is also developing in the Tropics where a band of weather is pushing north into Florida and the South to bring a risk of a tropical storm arriving early in the season.

Accuweather reports the first tropical storm or depression of the 2018 season could be seen as early as Tuesday night with warm air and precipitation pushing into the Florida Panhandle.
 
Some models are reporting the storm will lack the power to produce a large amount of damage as the temperature of water in the Atlantic Ocean is offering marginal chances of a tropical storm developing.
 
The storm could still take a turn to the west and gain power as it passes over the Gulf of Mexico to produce storms as far west as the border region between Alabama and Florida; as the week progresses the storm is expected to pass over the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic bringing the threat of flash floods and dangerous surf to many areas.

Wednesday afternoon and early evening will be marked by the rising chances of severe weather moving through the Central Plains as the Texas Panhandle once again comes into the firing line for thunderstorms and possible tornadoes.
 
A line of storms is being forecast by The Weather Channel which will push into northern Texas and Oklahoma in the Deep South. Severe thunderstorms and possible tornadoes could also be seen along the border between Colorado and Kansas before striking Nebraska and the Dakotas.
 
Above-average temperatures will be seen in many of the areas affected by severe weather including Lubbock, Texas where the daytime high will reach 89F.

Another major band of rain has begun to develop in the Southwest where daytime highs will hit the low to mid-70s across the Pacific Northwest and the Northern Rockies where thunderstorms could develop across Montana.
 
By Thursday, this band of rain will have moved into the Northern Plains and Midwest but should not offer a significant chance of severe weather developing across any part of the U.S.
 
The Northeast should remain clear of rain and storms as Boston hits a daytime high of 77F.
 
As the tropical band of weather moves into the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic, storms could be seen from Tampa, Florida where a daytime high of 85 will be possible and Atlanta, Georgia which will reach a Thursday high of 79.