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Obesity-Related Cancers on Rise in Young Adults
 
United States millennials ages 24 to 49 who are overweight are discovering that they are forming more cancers than in previous years, according to a recent study done by the Center for Disease Control (https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db288.pdf). Obese individuals experience a wide variety of types of cancers which may be related to the amount they weigh. Some of these types of cancer include those such as:

Colorectal
Uterine
Kidney
Gallbladder
Pancreatic
Multiple myelomas

These cancers have increased significantly as compared to the cancer rates of these areas in older adults. The percentage of cancer's increase has grown enough to be deemed a risk in setting back the gains the medical community has been making in reducing cancer in America.

Cancer Numbers in Obese Individuals

According to recent studies, the risk of such cancers as uterine, gallbladder and colorectal tumors has doubled in people born since the year 2000 as compared to folks born during the baby boomer years of the1950s. The researchers reported that the tendency for younger individuals to get cancer in these areas remains due to a more extended and more youthful exposure of these people to extra weight. America is not the only country experiencing this phenomenon of the link between cancer and being overweight.
 
Younger generations around the world are also experiencing a growth in cancer rates that seem to be related to gaining weight at an earlier age if a person smokes and is overweight, their chances of getting specific cancers increases, too. This study was done in 25 states, and information collected between 1995 and 2014.

Gastric non-cardia cancer and leukemia also showed an increase in incidence in younger adults during this time. These younger adults may or may not have been overweight, however. Other risk factors for cancer in the individuals studied were not tracked in this study.

The database doesn't include specific details about the method of detection of cancer or other risk factors that may be involved besides obesity, however. The findings remain significant enough for the researchers to believe that their study findings have important implications for public health, and are sharing the information with policymakers and other health care providers.
 
This test may provide a guide for further future study on the relationship between early onset of cancer and the present epidemic of obesity. Plus, cancer trends in younger adults may also prove to be an indication of a future burden of the disease in older adults.
 
United States millennials ages 24 to 49 who are overweight are discovering that they are forming more cancers than in previous years, according to a recent study done by the Center for Disease Control (https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db288.pdf). Obese individuals experience a wide variety of types of cancers which may be related to the amount they weigh.


Some of these types of cancer include those such as:

Colorectal
Uterine
Kidney
Gallbladder
Pancreatic
Multiple myelomas

These cancers have increased significantly as compared to the cancer rates of these areas in older adults. The percentage of cancer's increase has grown enough to be deemed a risk in setting back the gains the medical community has been making in reducing cancer in America.

Cancer Numbers in Obese Individuals

According to recent studies, the risk of such cancers as uterine, gallbladder and colorectal tumors has doubled in people born since the year 2000 as compared to folks born during the baby boomer years of the1950s. The researchers reported that the tendency for younger individuals to get cancer in these areas remains due to a more extended and more youthful exposure of these people to extra weight. America is not the only country experiencing this phenomenon of the link between cancer and being overweight.
 
Younger generations around the world are also experiencing a growth in cancer rates that seem to be related to gaining weight at an earlier age if a person smokes and is overweight, their chances of getting specific cancers increases, too. This study was done in 25 states, and information collected between 1995 and 2014.

Gastric non-cardia cancer and leukemia also showed an increase in incidence in younger adults during this time. These younger adults may or may not have been overweight, however. Other risk factors for cancer in the individuals studied were not tracked in this study.

The database doesn't include specific details about the method of detection of cancer or other risk factors that may be involved besides obesity, however. The findings remain significant enough for the researchers to believe that their study findings have important implications for public health, and are sharing the information with policymakers and other health care providers.
 
This test may provide a guide for further future study on the relationship between early onset of cancer and the present epidemic of obesity. Plus, cancer trends in younger adults may also prove to be an indication of a future burden of the disease in older adults.