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Apple Introduces Major Upgrades to Trademark iPhone

Apple released the latest in smartphone technology Tuesday -- the $1,000 iPhone X (the X stands for the number 10, not the letter X) -- a gadget Apple calls the new generation of mobile communication.

Apple CEO Tim Cook unveiled the new phone at the first event to be staged at the Steve Jobs Theater -- named for the late Apple founder who introduced the iPhone 10 years ago.

"Ten years later, it is only fitting that we are here in this place, on this day, to reveal a product that will set the path for technology for the next decade," Cook said.

Among its many features, the new iPhone can shoot better photographs in low light and has wireless recharging. Perhaps its most unique new feature: The new phone can be unlocked by facial recognition.

But the big question is, will consumers hand over $1,000 for a fancy, feature-laden telephone?

"Just because you're unhappy with your phone, just because it seems to not be working, doesn't necessarily mean that you absolutely need that shiny new thing," Mark Hamrick, a senior analyst with Bankrate.com, said.

But Hamrick says he believes Apple did a very good job with innovation along with the hardware and software that went into the iPhone X. He says there will always be a market for it, despite the high price tag.

"I think, truly, that there are some people out there who will skip meals to have these devices. We can debate whether that's wise or not. ... What we're really talking about is not paying cash for these devices, but looking at the monthly payment," Hamrick said.

Apple has sold more than 1.2 billion iPhones since it released its first one in 2007. The company is looking to the iPhone X to revive its sagging market share as other companies grab a piece of the multibillion-dollar industry.

Also Tuesday, Apple introduced major upgrades to its TV streaming device and to the Apple Watch, including an ability to detect an elevated heart rate when the user is inactive.


Apple May Test Bounds of iPhone Love with $1,000 Model

Apple is expected to sell its fanciest iPhone yet for $1,000, crossing into a new financial frontier that will test how much consumers are willing to pay for a device that's become an indispensable part of modern life.

The unveiling of a dramatically redesigned iPhone will likely be the marquee moment Tuesday when Apple hosts its first product event at its new spaceship-like headquarters in Cupertino, California. True to its secretive ways, Apple won't confirm that it will be introducing a new iPhone, though a financial forecast issued last month telegraphed something significant is in the pipeline.

In addition to several new features, a souped-up "anniversary" iPhone - coming a decade after Apple's late co-founder Steve Jobs unveiled the first version - could also debut at an attention-getting $999 price tag, twice what the original iPhone cost. It would set a new price threshold for any smartphone intended to appeal to a mass market.

What $1,000 bucks will buy

Various leaks have indicated the new phone will feature a sharper display, a so-called OLED screen that will extend from edge to edge of the device, thus eliminating the exterior gap, or "bezel," that currently surrounds most phone screens.

It may also boast facial recognition technology for unlocking the phone and wireless charging. A better camera is a safe bet, too.

All those features have been available on other smartphones that sold for less than $1,000, but Apple's sense of design and marketing flair has a way of making them seem irresistible - and worth the extra expense.

"Apple always seems to take what others have done and do it even better," said Carolina Milanesi, an analyst with Creative Strategies.

Why phones cost more, not less

Apple isn't the only company driving up smartphone prices. Market leader Samsung Electronics just rolled out its Galaxy Note 8 with a starting price of $930.

The trend reflects the increasing sophistication of smartphones, which have been evolving into status symbols akin to automobiles. In both cases, many consumers appear willing to pay a premium price for luxury models that take them where they want to go in style.

"Calling it a smartphone doesn't come close to how people use it, view it and embrace it in their lives," said Debby Ruth, senior vice president of the consumer research firm Magid. "It's an extension of themselves, it's their entry into the world, it's their connection to their friends."

From that perspective, it's easy to understand why some smartphones now cost more than many kinds of laptop computers, said technology analyst Patrick Moorhead.

"People now value their phones more than any other device and, in some cases, even more than food and sex," Moorhead said.

The luxury-good challenge

Longtime Apple expert Gene Munster, now managing partner at research and venture capital firm Loup Ventures, predicts 20 percent of the iPhones sold during the next year will be the new $1,000 model.

Wireless carriers eager to connect with Apple's generally affluent clientele are likely to either sell the iPhone at a discount or offer appealing subsidies that spread the cost of the device over two to three years to minimize the sticker shock, said analyst Jan Dawson of Jackdaw Research.

Even Munster's sales forecast holds true, it still shows most people either can't afford or aren't interested in paying that much for a smartphone.

That's one reason Apple also is expected to announce minor upgrades to the iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus. That will make it easier for Apple to create several different pricing tiers, with the oldest model possibly becoming available for free with a wireless contract.

But the deluxe model virtually assures that the average price of the iPhone - now at $606 versus $561 three years ago - will keep climbing. That runs counter to the usual tech trajectory in which the price of electronics, whether televisions or computers, falls over time.

"The iPhone has always had a way of defying the law of physics," Munster said, "and I think it will do it in spades with this higher priced one."

Apple released the latest in smartphone technology Tuesday -- the $1,000 iPhone X (the X stands for the number 10, not the letter X) -- a gadget Apple calls the new generation of mobile communication.

Apple CEO Tim Cook unveiled the new phone at the first event to be staged at the Steve Jobs Theater -- named for the late Apple founder who introduced the iPhone 10 years ago.

"Ten years later, it is only fitting that we are here in this place, on this day, to reveal a product that will set the path for technology for the next decade," Cook said.

Among its many features, the new iPhone can shoot better photographs in low light and has wireless recharging.


Perhaps its most unique new feature: The new phone can be unlocked by facial recognition.

But the big question is, will consumers hand over $1,000 for a fancy, feature-laden telephone?

"Just because you're unhappy with your phone, just because it seems to not be working, doesn't necessarily mean that you absolutely need that shiny new thing," Mark Hamrick, a senior analyst with Bankrate.com, said.

But Hamrick says he believes Apple did a very good job with innovation along with the hardware and software that went into the iPhone X. He says there will always be a market for it, despite the high price tag.

"I think, truly, that there are some people out there who will skip meals to have these devices. We can debate whether that's wise or not. ... What we're really talking about is not paying cash for these devices, but looking at the monthly payment," Hamrick said.

Apple has sold more than 1.2 billion iPhones since it released its first one in 2007. The company is looking to the iPhone X to revive its sagging market share as other companies grab a piece of the multibillion-dollar industry.

Also Tuesday, Apple introduced major upgrades to its TV streaming device and to the Apple Watch, including an ability to detect an elevated heart rate when the user is inactive.


Apple May Test Bounds of iPhone Love with $1,000 Model

Apple is expected to sell its fanciest iPhone yet for $1,000, crossing into a new financial frontier that will test how much consumers are willing to pay for a device that's become an indispensable part of modern life.

The unveiling of a dramatically redesigned iPhone will likely be the marquee moment Tuesday when Apple hosts its first product event at its new spaceship-like headquarters in Cupertino, California. True to its secretive ways, Apple won't confirm that it will be introducing a new iPhone, though a financial forecast issued last month telegraphed something significant is in the pipeline.

In addition to several new features, a souped-up "anniversary" iPhone - coming a decade after Apple's late co-founder Steve Jobs unveiled the first version - could also debut at an attention-getting $999 price tag, twice what the original iPhone cost. It would set a new price threshold for any smartphone intended to appeal to a mass market.

What $1,000 bucks will buy

Various leaks have indicated the new phone will feature a sharper display, a so-called OLED screen that will extend from edge to edge of the device, thus eliminating the exterior gap, or "bezel," that currently surrounds most phone screens.

It may also boast facial recognition technology for unlocking the phone and wireless charging. A better camera is a safe bet, too.

All those features have been available on other smartphones that sold for less than $1,000, but Apple's sense of design and marketing flair has a way of making them seem irresistible - and worth the extra expense.

"Apple always seems to take what others have done and do it even better," said Carolina Milanesi, an analyst with Creative Strategies.

Why phones cost more, not less

Apple isn't the only company driving up smartphone prices. Market leader Samsung Electronics just rolled out its Galaxy Note 8 with a starting price of $930.

The trend reflects the increasing sophistication of smartphones, which have been evolving into status symbols akin to automobiles. In both cases, many consumers appear willing to pay a premium price for luxury models that take them where they want to go in style.

"Calling it a smartphone doesn't come close to how people use it, view it and embrace it in their lives," said Debby Ruth, senior vice president of the consumer research firm Magid. "It's an extension of themselves, it's their entry into the world, it's their connection to their friends."

From that perspective, it's easy to understand why some smartphones now cost more than many kinds of laptop computers, said technology analyst Patrick Moorhead.

"People now value their phones more than any other device and, in some cases, even more than food and sex," Moorhead said.

The luxury-good challenge

Longtime Apple expert Gene Munster, now managing partner at research and venture capital firm Loup Ventures, predicts 20 percent of the iPhones sold during the next year will be the new $1,000 model.

Wireless carriers eager to connect with Apple's generally affluent clientele are likely to either sell the iPhone at a discount or offer appealing subsidies that spread the cost of the device over two to three years to minimize the sticker shock, said analyst Jan Dawson of Jackdaw Research.

Even Munster's sales forecast holds true, it still shows most people either can't afford or aren't interested in paying that much for a smartphone.

That's one reason Apple also is expected to announce minor upgrades to the iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus. That will make it easier for Apple to create several different pricing tiers, with the oldest model possibly becoming available for free with a wireless contract.

But the deluxe model virtually assures that the average price of the iPhone - now at $606 versus $561 three years ago - will keep climbing. That runs counter to the usual tech trajectory in which the price of electronics, whether televisions or computers, falls over time.

"The iPhone has always had a way of defying the law of physics," Munster said, "and I think it will do it in spades with this higher priced one."



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