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BREAKING WEATHER:    WEATHER RADAR MAP      AIRPORT CLOSING AND DELAY INFORMATION     


.........SEVERE WEATHER MAP.....

How does the radar work? NEXRAD (Next Generation Radar) obtains weather information (precipitation and wind) based upon returned energy. The radar emits a burst of energy (green). If the energy strikes an object (rain drop, bug, bird, etc), the energy is scattered in all directions (blue). A small fraction of that scattered energy is directed back toward the radar. This reflected signal is then received by the radar during its listening period. Computers analyze the strength of the returned pulse, time it took to travel to the object and back, and phase shift of the pulse. This process of emitting a signal, listening for any returned signal, then emitting the next signal, takes place very fast, up to around 1300 times each second. NEXRAD spends the vast amount of time "listening" for returning signals it sent. When the time of all the pulses each hour are totaled (the time the radar is actually transmitting), the radar is "on" for about 7 seconds each hour. The remaining 59 minutes and 53 seconds are spent listening for any returned signals. The ability to detect the "shift in the phase" of the pulse of energy makes NEXRAD a Doppler radar. The phase of the returning signal typically changes based upon the motion of the raindrops (or bugs, dust, etc.). This Doppler effect was named after the Austrian physicist, Christian Doppler, who discovered it.
YOUR LOCAL RADAR MAP HERE 



------------  LOCAL RADAR MAPS LINK   -------------



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NAPLES, Fla. - Governor Rick Scott received a briefing at the Collier County Emergency Operations Center from local fire officials, law enforcement, the Florida Forestry Service and local emergency management officials on the wildfires in Collier, Lee and Polk Counties.

Governor Scott said, "Firefighters and first responders from all across the state have been fighting the wildfires in Southwest Florida day and night, and we are all incredibly grateful for their hard work.




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"The U.N. remains an indispensable instrument for advancing the global stability and prosperity on which U.S. interests and priorities depend," the ambassadors wrote. "We therefore urge you to support U.S. leadership at the U.N., including through continued payment of our assessed and voluntary financial contributions to the organization.




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U.S. President Donald Trump is set to call for a sharp reduction in the nation's corporate tax rate, the highest among the world's industrialized countries.

Trump is planning to unveil his tax plans Wednesday, with aides saying he will ask Congress to slash the current 35 percent rate down to 15 percent, a pledge he first made during last year's presidential election campaign.

White House spokesman Sean Spicer said the U.




US Students Score Poorly on National Arts and Music Exam

When it comes to music and visual arts, American teenagers could use some help.

The National Center for Education Statistics reported Tuesday that in 2016, American eighth graders scored an average 147 in music and 149 in visual arts on a scale of 300. Some 8,800 eighth graders from public and private schools across the country took part in the test, which was part of the National Assessment of Educational Progress, often called the Nation's Report Card.




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The quake was centered about 85 miles (137 km) from Santiago, and some 22 miles (35 km) west of the coastal city of Valparaiso. The U.S. Geological Survey twice revised the magnitude before settling on 6.9, a strength usually capable of causing severe damage.




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After crowds rallied in Washington and more than 600 other locations around the world April 22, march planners now urge those who participated to go out into their communities and advocate for science.

"WE MARCHED.




US Hits Hundreds of Syrian Tech Workers with New Sanctions

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These expanded sanctions, announced Monday in Washington, target workers at the Syrian Scientific Studies and Research Center, a Damascus-based facility linked to the research and development of biological, chemical and missile related technology.




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