5 Foods High in Calcium

According to a government report, only 21% of the people in the US are getting enough calcium in their diets. Calcium is remarkably important to our health, even if we don't count osteoporosis. Calcium is essential to heart and muscle function, and it plays a role in blood clotting and nervous system operation.

Calcium also helps weight loss, reduces or prevents PMS, prevents cancer of the colon, and may be more important than sodium in keeping your blood pressure down.

It's also remarkably important to your bone health, but you knew that.

The RDA and safe maximum of calcium intake vary with sex and age. Until 50, the RDA is 1,000 mg, and you shouldn't get any more than 2,500 mg. After 50, the upper safe limit goes down to 2,000 mg, and women should get at least 1,200 mg. After 71, the RDA for men also goes up to 1,200.

Here are foods that have the most calcium:

Cheese

Cheese is one of the best foods to eat for calcium. 1 oz of American cheese has 175 mg, while the harder cheeses have 200 mg or more per ounce.

Yogurt

Plain fat-free yogurt has, per 8 oz serving, 488 mg. of calcium. Low-fat has a little less, at 448 mg. Yogurt with fruit in it has less, because part of those 8 oz are fruit.

Greek yogurt has more protein than regular yogurt, but it has less calcium, averaging 200 mg. per serving. Check the labels to be certain.

Yogurt also has Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei and Bifidus, which are probiotics that are important to your digestive health.

Milk

Milk has 275 - 305 mg of calcium per cup, depending on the fat level of the milk. When they take fat out of milk, they leave the calcium behind, so it is a bit more concentrated.
Sardines and Canned Salmon

These are excellent sources of calcium, because of all of those small, soft, digestable bones in them. A 3oz serving of oil-packed Atlantic sardines has just over 320 mg of calcium. They are also very rich in vitamin D, which you need to absorb calcium.

Green Leafy Vegetables

Dark leafy greens like spinach, kale, turnip and collard greens have lots of calcium.
1/2 cup of sauteed spinach has 110 mg of calcium, and a cup of kale has almost that much.

The problem here is that these vegetables also have oxalic acid, which binds with the calcium so that our bodies can't absorb it. In fact, if you drink milk with the spinach, the oxalic acid will bind with some of that calcium, too.

Dairy products and fish with soft, digestable bones are your best options in getting enough calcium.

According to a government report, only 21% of the people in the US are getting enough calcium in their diets. Calcium is remarkably important to our health, even if we don't count osteoporosis. Calcium is essential to heart and muscle function, and it plays a role in blood clotting and nervous system operation.

Calcium also helps weight loss, reduces or prevents PMS, prevents cancer of the colon, and may be more important than sodium in keeping your blood pressure down.


It's also remarkably important to your bone health, but you knew that.

The RDA and safe maximum of calcium intake vary with sex and age. Until 50, the RDA is 1,000 mg, and you shouldn't get any more than 2,500 mg. After 50, the upper safe limit goes down to 2,000 mg, and women should get at least 1,200 mg. After 71, the RDA for men also goes up to 1,200.

Here are foods that have the most calcium:

Cheese

Cheese is one of the best foods to eat for calcium. 1 oz of American cheese has 175 mg, while the harder cheeses have 200 mg or more per ounce.

Yogurt

Plain fat-free yogurt has, per 8 oz serving, 488 mg. of calcium. Low-fat has a little less, at 448 mg. Yogurt with fruit in it has less, because part of those 8 oz are fruit.

Greek yogurt has more protein than regular yogurt, but it has less calcium, averaging 200 mg. per serving. Check the labels to be certain.

Yogurt also has Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei and Bifidus, which are probiotics that are important to your digestive health.

Milk

Milk has 275 - 305 mg of calcium per cup, depending on the fat level of the milk. When they take fat out of milk, they leave the calcium behind, so it is a bit more concentrated.
Sardines and Canned Salmon

These are excellent sources of calcium, because of all of those small, soft, digestable bones in them. A 3oz serving of oil-packed Atlantic sardines has just over 320 mg of calcium. They are also very rich in vitamin D, which you need to absorb calcium.

Green Leafy Vegetables

Dark leafy greens like spinach, kale, turnip and collard greens have lots of calcium.
1/2 cup of sauteed spinach has 110 mg of calcium, and a cup of kale has almost that much.

The problem here is that these vegetables also have oxalic acid, which binds with the calcium so that our bodies can't absorb it. In fact, if you drink milk with the spinach, the oxalic acid will bind with some of that calcium, too.

Dairy products and fish with soft, digestable bones are your best options in getting enough calcium.