5 Cancers You're More Likely to Get if You're Overweight

 

Obesity and overweight have long been linked to cancer, but new research indicates that more cancers than previously thought are now linked to a person's weight. Overweight is defined as a body mass index, or BMI, of more than 25; obese is defined as a BMI over 30. Experts think that up to 20 percent of all new cancers in the U.S. are attributable to being overweight or obese, particularly if the individual carries considerable belly fat.

An overweight or obese individual is more likely to develop one or more of the following five cancers:

Stomach
Thyroid
Gallbladder
Pancreas
Ovaries

Stomach Cancer

Overweight or obesity triggers inflammation in the stomach and the stomach lining, due in part to the excess stomach acid that is often associated with overweight or obesity. Overeating or binge eating can trigger more stomach acid, which triggers more inflammation, which can then lead to cancer.

Thyroid Cancer

When body mass increases, so does the size of the thyroid. This can produce a hormonal imbalance, and high TSH levels have been correlated to the onset of thyroid cancer.

Gallbladder Cancer

The incidence of gallstones increases with weight gain, due in part to the chronic inflammation that is a by-product of being overweight or obese. The presence of gallstones increases the likelihood of developing gallbladder cancer.

Pancreatic Cancer

The pancreas is the organ responsible for the production of insulin. Overweight and obesity disrupt the normal production of insulin and can lead to pancreatic cancer. Obesity and overweight are usually linked to a reduction in activity, which can lead to diabetes, and then to cancer. A recent study linked about 10 percent of new pancreatic cancers to overweight and obesity.

Pancreatic cancer is more prevalent in older adults and is the tenth most common cancer.

Ovarian Cancer

A causative link between ovarian cancer and overweight or obesity has been established. Part of the reason is the excess hormones that are stored in body fat; excess estrogen and/or insulin disrupts the body's normal chemical balance and can cause abnormalities in cell reproduction, which can lead to ovarian cancer.

Summary

Age, history of being overweight and/or obese, genetics, environmental factors, and so forth, can also play a part in the likelihood of developing cancers, but weight is the most controllable factor. By losing weight, those who are currently overweight or obese may make a positive and significant impact on their health and risk of developing cancer.

 

Obesity and overweight have long been linked to cancer, but new research indicates that more cancers than previously thought are now linked to a person's weight. Overweight is defined as a body mass index, or BMI, of more than 25; obese is defined as a BMI over 30. Experts think that up to 20 percent of all new cancers in the U.S. are attributable to being overweight or obese, particularly if the individual carries considerable belly fat.

An overweight or obese individual is more likely to develop one or more of the following five cancers:

Stomach
Thyroid
Gallbladder
Pancreas
Ovaries

Stomach Cancer

Overweight or obesity triggers inflammation in the stomach and the stomach lining, due in part to the excess stomach acid that is often associated with overweight or obesity.


Overeating or binge eating can trigger more stomach acid, which triggers more inflammation, which can then lead to cancer.

Thyroid Cancer

When body mass increases, so does the size of the thyroid. This can produce a hormonal imbalance, and high TSH levels have been correlated to the onset of thyroid cancer.

Gallbladder Cancer

The incidence of gallstones increases with weight gain, due in part to the chronic inflammation that is a by-product of being overweight or obese. The presence of gallstones increases the likelihood of developing gallbladder cancer.

Pancreatic Cancer

The pancreas is the organ responsible for the production of insulin. Overweight and obesity disrupt the normal production of insulin and can lead to pancreatic cancer. Obesity and overweight are usually linked to a reduction in activity, which can lead to diabetes, and then to cancer. A recent study linked about 10 percent of new pancreatic cancers to overweight and obesity.

Pancreatic cancer is more prevalent in older adults and is the tenth most common cancer.

Ovarian Cancer

A causative link between ovarian cancer and overweight or obesity has been established. Part of the reason is the excess hormones that are stored in body fat; excess estrogen and/or insulin disrupts the body's normal chemical balance and can cause abnormalities in cell reproduction, which can lead to ovarian cancer.

Summary

Age, history of being overweight and/or obese, genetics, environmental factors, and so forth, can also play a part in the likelihood of developing cancers, but weight is the most controllable factor. By losing weight, those who are currently overweight or obese may make a positive and significant impact on their health and risk of developing cancer.