Is It Healthy to Want to Be Alone?
 
Many people thrive when they're surrounded by others. For others, however--particularly women--it can be challenging to be around large numbers of people.
 
You may find yourself wondering, "Is it really healthy to want to be alone?"
 
The good news is, there's no need to worry about your health if you enjoy spending a little time by yourself, diving into your favorite pastimes, instead of surrounding yourself with other people.

Understanding Introversion

There are two different types of people: introverts and extroverts. Extroverts thrive on being around people. They recharge by sitting in a large group, sharing stories and laughing about everything going on in their lives. Introverts, on the other hand, need time to themselves in order to recharge. A good book or program on TV, a mug of a soothing tea, and a quiet house are some of an introvert's favorite things.

In between extrovert and introvert, there are a wide range of personalities. Some people are extroverts who still occasionally need time alone with their thoughts. Even the most introverted person may still enjoy getting together with friends and family members. It's important to understand that even if you are an extrovert, there's nothing wrong with the need for some occasional quiet time to yourself--and if you're an introvert, that alone time is probably a requirement for your continued personal well-being.

Seasons of Life

Whether you prefer to be with another person or to be alone may also vary based on the season of life you're currently living. Mothers of young children or those who are caregivers in another way--to elderly individuals; to children at school as a teacher; to a spouse whose health isn't doing well and who needs a great deal of energy and attention--may find that they are in desperate need of time to themselves in order to rest and recharge. It's not unusual to feel "touched out" or as though you are pulled in all directions all the time. During these seasons of life, time alone may be even more critical than at any other time in your life.

Finding Time Alone

It's not possible to be alone all the time, unless of course you have no family or friends and a job that doesn't require you to leave the house. Fortunately, there are still ways that you can find time to rest and recharge.

- Designate specific times that are just for you. Be as religious about observing your alone time as you are about ensuring that you make an appointment with loved ones.

- Choose a spot in your house that is just yours. If you have small children, this may be in the bathtub--and that's okay! When you're in that place, let everyone know not to bother you unless there's an emergency.

- Find time during the usual work day for a little time to yourself. Go to a secluded coffee house or a restaurant that sees more business during the evening hours.

- Ask your spouse to take the kids out for a few hours so you can have some time to yourself. Commit to unwinding, not cleaning or rushing through chores that need to be taken care of. This is your time!

Time alone is a normal, healthy part of self-care. Chances are, after a little time alone, you'll find yourself ready to dive in and be with your family and friends again.

 
Many people thrive when they're surrounded by others. For others, however--particularly women--it can be challenging to be around large numbers of people.
 
You may find yourself wondering, "Is it really healthy to want to be alone?"
 
The good news is, there's no need to worry about your health if you enjoy spending a little time by yourself, diving into your favorite pastimes, instead of surrounding yourself with other people.




Understanding Introversion

There are two different types of people: introverts and extroverts. Extroverts thrive on being around people. They recharge by sitting in a large group, sharing stories and laughing about everything going on in their lives. Introverts, on the other hand, need time to themselves in order to recharge. A good book or program on TV, a mug of a soothing tea, and a quiet house are some of an introvert's favorite things.

In between extrovert and introvert, there are a wide range of personalities. Some people are extroverts who still occasionally need time alone with their thoughts. Even the most introverted person may still enjoy getting together with friends and family members. It's important to understand that even if you are an extrovert, there's nothing wrong with the need for some occasional quiet time to yourself--and if you're an introvert, that alone time is probably a requirement for your continued personal well-being.

Seasons of Life

Whether you prefer to be with another person or to be alone may also vary based on the season of life you're currently living. Mothers of young children or those who are caregivers in another way--to elderly individuals; to children at school as a teacher; to a spouse whose health isn't doing well and who needs a great deal of energy and attention--may find that they are in desperate need of time to themselves in order to rest and recharge. It's not unusual to feel "touched out" or as though you are pulled in all directions all the time. During these seasons of life, time alone may be even more critical than at any other time in your life.

Finding Time Alone

It's not possible to be alone all the time, unless of course you have no family or friends and a job that doesn't require you to leave the house. Fortunately, there are still ways that you can find time to rest and recharge.

- Designate specific times that are just for you. Be as religious about observing your alone time as you are about ensuring that you make an appointment with loved ones.

- Choose a spot in your house that is just yours. If you have small children, this may be in the bathtub--and that's okay! When you're in that place, let everyone know not to bother you unless there's an emergency.

- Find time during the usual work day for a little time to yourself. Go to a secluded coffee house or a restaurant that sees more business during the evening hours.

- Ask your spouse to take the kids out for a few hours so you can have some time to yourself. Commit to unwinding, not cleaning or rushing through chores that need to be taken care of. This is your time!

Time alone is a normal, healthy part of self-care. Chances are, after a little time alone, you'll find yourself ready to dive in and be with your family and friends again.